The fleeing NY Lonelylite.

Page 68. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote “In a trance.” “Taxi!” We feel his despair. How he compares a taxi ride across Central Park with flying over the Andes – & gets away with it! I believe him. & the lovely New York socialite has no friends. Not really. Page 75. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by:…

“Le Petit Prince” & my heartstrings.

I’ve been working on my novel this afternoon & for quite a few years now, might I add. Any who, I decided to take a quick pause & read over Le Petite Prince, one of my favourite childhood books. Because – if there is anything I like as much as writing, & dreaming, you know…

Book vs. Movie, Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) Blake Edwards (1922-2010) directed the famous movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s based on the novel by Truman Capote. Holly is played by the iconic Audrey Hepburn & the narrator is played by George Peppard. This movie shows a lighter, more positive adaptation of the novel. Creating an interpretation with a more satisfying ending for the general public….

Glass, perfume, & death.

Page 61-62. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote In this extract the most tragic thing for Holly occurs. The person she loves the most, her little brother, has been killed at war. She has just been informed & her reaction isn’t more than we could expect. I am not sure if I am looking too much…

A Wild Thing & New York. 

Page 59. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote Holly Golightly quite literally compares herself to a wounded wild animal. In other words, she says that love feeds her, heals her, & makes her stronger. Strong enough simply to run away again, or in this case, to fly. For the first time, we can tell that she…

Cages & Masks. 

Page 44. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote We see the streets of New York & the windows of its antique shops. Movement. & we’re back to her for a second. “But still, it’s a cage.” Poetry. Fear. Truth. & we’re moving again, this time quicker. The most enchanting side of her shows. She’s a…

Run-away child.

Page 43. Second-to-last paragraph. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote I find this selected passage vague but whole. It reminds me of an abstract painting around the center of it. & it ends with a somehow tender bang. In this brief paragraph, Capote takes us on a ride that begins with blinding bliss, then reminds us of…