Mary Jane Confessions.

Page 72-73. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman CapoteDon’t you just love her? Bearer of the truth. She wasn’t lying either when she spoke about the importance of honesty. Even being prosecuted, surrounded by reporters she speaks with sincerity. Stay curious, B.

Horseback riding through Central Park. 

Page 69. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote A couple of friends horseback riding through Central Park. “It’s great!” His love for her. & the perfect combination of the way she looks & the way he feels.   Stay curious, B.

The fleeing NY Lonelylite.

Page 68. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote “In a trance.” “Taxi!” We feel his despair. How he compares a taxi ride across Central Park with flying over the Andes – & gets away with it! I believe him. & the lovely New York socialite has no friends. Not really. Page 75. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by:…

Love monologues & leaves.

Page 64-67. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman CapoteAmidst the rambling on of her monologue about children and marriage: “José had never suggested marriage. She admitted it.” Yet she goes on about details of exactly what their kids would look like! We find out about her pregnancy with an obvious calm in her attitude. “I don’t see…

Glass, perfume, & death.

Page 61-62. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote In this extract the most tragic thing for Holly occurs. The person she loves the most, her little brother, has been killed at war. She has just been informed & her reaction isn’t more than we could expect. I am not sure if I am looking too much…

A Wild Thing & New York. 

Page 59. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote Holly Golightly quite literally compares herself to a wounded wild animal. In other words, she says that love feeds her, heals her, & makes her stronger. Strong enough simply to run away again, or in this case, to fly. For the first time, we can tell that she…

Cages & Masks. 

Page 44. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote We see the streets of New York & the windows of its antique shops. Movement. & we’re back to her for a second. “But still, it’s a cage.” Poetry. Fear. Truth. & we’re moving again, this time quicker. The most enchanting side of her shows. She’s a…

Run-away child.

Page 43. Second-to-last paragraph. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by: Truman Capote I find this selected passage vague but whole. It reminds me of an abstract painting around the center of it. & it ends with a somehow tender bang. In this brief paragraph, Capote takes us on a ride that begins with blinding bliss, then reminds us of…